New genome sequencing reveals coffee’s future

Upon first glance, the large bushy plant with branches filled with tiny, jasmine-scented flowers appear to be something even the pickiest gardener would welcome.  These pure white flowers are highly fragrant and beautiful, but are a side-effect to the true commodity of this particular plant, the reddish-purple berries that come after the flowers have disappeared.  The deep crimson is not a perfectly ripe cherry, but holds one of the biggest cash crops in the world: the coffee bean.

Coffee plants in the mountains of Mexico

While the beautiful plants promising coffee paint a beautiful picture of serene gardening, the coffee plant is in trouble.  Climate change, viruses, and fungi are all taking a huge financial toll on coffee production, making the recent coffee genome sequencing even more essential to keep this industry percolating.

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How to avoid becoming a character on the Walking Dead (through science!)

Zombies vs. Humans on the Walking Dead. This could be avoidable with the right chemistry!

Just in time for Halloween (my personal favorite holiday), Scientific American has published an interview with a chemist and zombie fan, Dr. Raychelle Burks.  She advises us that, in case of zombie apocalypse, Eau de Death may be our best hope.
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The Safest Explosion: The Science of Airbag Technology in Motorcycles

As motorcycles increase on the road, often as a fuel-efficient commuting choice, what is the best way to keep these riders safe?  While helmets and armored clothing protect many, the vast majority of motorcycles lack airbags, despite being a required safety feature in cars that save thousands of lives per year.  The Multistrada D-Air, a new integrated airbag system from Ducati and Dainese, aims to bring airbags to the motorcycle market in a new and innovative way.   But how do these systems work?
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